naturalization records--way to acquire them

Determine if an ancestor was ever naturalized and, if so, discuss your consulate's requirements for proving this.

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naturalization records--way to acquire them

Postby gb » Tue May 03, 2005 8:57 pm

my great grandfather was never naturalized according to family members. since the county superior court only stamps a designation onto a sheet of paper or letter sent to them "No naturalization records found from 18xx- 19XX" and the san francisco consulate requires a letter stating that no records were found, i'm not sure if this will suffice. i'm thinking i should just make a letter with all the specifics on it and just have them stamp it instead of send me a blank piece of paper with that "no records" stamp on it. also for those people under the same consulate i'm pretty sure you can get washington d.c. naturalization records from NCIS at your local district office. you just have to fill out an infopass online appointment request and fill out a freedom of information act form. they need name, date/place of birth, nicknames, and naturaliztion number and/or alien number. not sure how to get that. i think its probably best to request records from national archives first.. i'm sure they have this info.
gb
 

Postby Guest » Wed Jul 06, 2005 11:24 pm

The best way to give evidence of non-naturalization is to get a "Certificate of Non-Existence of Record" from USCIS (formerly INS). Cost = $4.00. They will give it to you upon request after they search their files. They are slow, though, and it may take several months.
Guest
 

Postby Anonymous » Thu Aug 25, 2005 12:54 pm

Can the USCIS search and tell you whether the person in question was naturalized or not?

My grandfather was an Italian citizen (born and raised there) but then fought in WWII which made him an automatic citizen. Does that mean he was naturalized?

Where is the USCIS located and what is their contact info?

-Jessica
Anonymous
 

world war 2

Postby mary » Sat Nov 12, 2005 2:19 am

From what I read entering the armed services makes someone an automatic citizen of the US. If the ancestor that you are following your attempt for Italian citizenship joined the service or was naturalized before the birth of his child that child lost its right to Italian citizenship by descent. In that case you might try another relative from Italy.
mary
 

Postby Guest » Fri Dec 02, 2005 11:19 pm

Anonymous wrote:The best way to give evidence of non-naturalization is to get a "Certificate of Non-Existence of Record" from USCIS (formerly INS). Cost = $4.00. They will give it to you upon request after they search their files. They are slow, though, and it may take several months.


can you state how to get this record? , is there a website etc
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Postby Guest » Sat Dec 03, 2005 1:24 am

http://uscis.gov/graphics/aboutus/history/natzrec/natrec.htm

Look into the link near the bottom of that page for the Freedom Of Information Act. You'll find a pdf form there.

Get a 639 (FOIA REQUEST), notarize and sign it, send it with proof of death and a copy of your driver's license.

Write a letter and attach it. Explain that you need it for dual citizenship, Request a certificate of non-existence of record. Give country where relative was born, date of birth, date of death and any other information that you may have such as when he came, where he lived. If you have an alien registration number, or any sort of thing like that, photocopy it, send it or just tell them the information in the letter.

Letter's like this are very helpful for them.

Good luck! Buona Fortuna!
Guest
 

Re: world war 2

Postby Em » Thu Apr 06, 2006 7:13 pm

mary wrote:From what I read entering the armed services makes someone an automatic citizen of the US. If the ancestor that you are following your attempt for Italian citizenship joined the service or was naturalized before the birth of his child that child lost its right to Italian citizenship by descent. In that case you might try another relative from Italy.


Remember, though, this is only true for someone born in Italy. If your ancestor was born in the U.S., no problem.
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