Need Help on Obtaining italian Citizenship august 8, 2006

Determine if an ancestor was ever naturalized and, if so, discuss your consulate's requirements for proving this.

Moderator: Daniel

Need Help on Obtaining italian Citizenship august 8, 2006

Postby Joe Diorio » Tue Aug 08, 2006 11:09 pm

Hello my name is Joe and i am seeking Italian citizenship. i am 20 yrs old from Philadelphia, Pa and ive had an interest in italy since i was a kid. My Paternal grandfathers parents are from Italy and have never obtained citizenship. the problem is that i do not know where my great grandfather is from, my grandfather says he's from Abbruzzi and my aunt says he was from the province of Campo Basso. i was able to obtain his Birth Date as well the name of his parents, including his mother's maiden name and the names of some of his siblings. he also came here illegally so i dont have any documentation from ellis island but i was able to obtain his world war II registration card from Ancestory.com and he has listed that he was born in a town Called Mateo, however i found no trace of such a town.
Furthermore, My mother's Father's grandparents, my Maternal Great Great Grandparents came from Italy and never became U.S. Citizens. and to my knowlege no one since then has renounced their italian citizenship. My aunt has Their Original birth Certificates from Salerno however i would need to obtain more documentation with this option in order to to prove my lineage.
If anyone could give me advice on my best option and on the next steps that would be much appreciated. My e-mail address is jdd37@drexel.edu. Thanks,


Joe
Joe Diorio
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2006 9:22 pm
Location: Philadelphia, Pa

Postby Em » Tue Aug 08, 2006 11:36 pm

If I understand you correctly, you trace your Italian ancestry from your great-grandparents on both your father's and mother's side of the family.

You need to determine, on each side, that the Italian bloodline was not broken through naturalization and/or the pre-1948 ruling that prohibited women from passing Italian citizenship to their children. It is in your best interests to trace your lineage from both sides of the family to determine what works best for you. One side may have name/spelling discrepancies along the way that will make the process more difficult.

I, too, had difficulty determining my grandfather's place of birth. Many records listed just Italy or Naples, but many people said they came from Naples if they left Italy from that port. I found more specific data on my grandparents marriage certificate. Since the marriage license information is completed by the marriage participant, this information is likely to be accurate (or as accurate as you can expect it to be considering the lack of care that was often given to such records).

Once you find the ancestor (mother or father's side) who represents the original Italian ancestor, you need to determine whether that ancestor was in a position to pass that citizenship to his son or daughter. To do so:

a. The ancestor must NOT have naturalized OR naturalized AFTER the date of his child's birth.

b. If the child was born before 1948, only the male could pass on citizenship. If the ancestor was a woman who had a child before 1948, the Italian connection stops there.

You need to follow this through for every generation, beginning with that of your great grandparents. Once you ensure that no naturalization took place (or that naturalization took place after the child's birth), you must then ascertain that the line is carried through the male. After 1948, this is no longer an issue.

So, you have some research to do.
User avatar
Em
 
Posts: 3028
Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2006 6:57 am

Postby bklaw » Sun Aug 20, 2006 2:23 pm

Joe-

This may not be helpful, but it is worth a try. Many Italian surnames are regional. For example, my family name originates from the Sorrento area. Whenever I do a search on Ancestry or Familysearch (Mormon site), 99% of the people found are located in the region where my family comes from. Although I know the town where my family orginates, it also helps because I know common family first names. Thus, with a little research you may be able to locate at least the region where you great grandfather came. I know when I started the research, it was specifically to figure out the towns my great grandparents came from and this lead to tracing back their lineage to 1710. By doing so, I was able to see the pattern of naming the children, etc. There also tended to be realtionship with other families in the area (e.g. marriage, and so forth).

I don't know if this is helpful, but it definitely worked for me and may be worth a try. Good Luck.

BK
bklaw
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2006 2:05 pm
Location: Chicago

Postby ejd » Thu Aug 24, 2006 8:59 pm

Your grandfather and aunt may both be right. The province of Campobasso is in the region of Molise. Molise used to be part of the Abruzzo region. Molise became its own region in 1963.

As for the town of Mateo.... You're going to have to keep searching other documents. I searched the Italy world club site (http://www.italyworldclub.com) to see if Mateo is a frazione (hamlet) in Molise. It's not listed as a frazione anywhere in Italy. I cannot find a comune named Mateo either. It's probably misspelled on the Army document.
ejd
 
Posts: 143
Joined: Sun Apr 02, 2006 7:38 pm

Postby Joe Diorio » Fri Aug 25, 2006 12:27 am

Em, they made a mistake. the town he is from is Macchia Valfortore in Campo basso. thanks

Joe
Joe Diorio
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2006 9:22 pm
Location: Philadelphia, Pa

Postby ejd » Fri Aug 25, 2006 12:34 pm

In case you didn't find this already:

http://molise.indettaglio.it/eng/comuni ... rtore.html

The town has 757 inhabitants, down from 964 in 1991.

I found one picture on another site but didn't save the link. It looks like a quiet hilltown.
ejd
 
Posts: 143
Joined: Sun Apr 02, 2006 7:38 pm


Return to Naturalization

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests