ideas? getting naturalization information w/o death cert.

Determine if an ancestor was ever naturalized and, if so, discuss your consulate's requirements for proving this.

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ideas? getting naturalization information w/o death cert.

Postby Bex » Tue Oct 31, 2006 4:40 pm

So, my great grandfather left the U.S. and spent the last half of his life in Buenos Aires. He died there and I have been unable to obtain a death certificate (certificato de defuncion) or a copy of an obituary.
I need any ideas on how to get the US CIS to release any naturalization information. Or any stories from people who had luck getting information w/o proof of death.
grrr. I am still working with the city of Buenos Aires, but adding another bureaucracy to this process is no fun!
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Postby Tiffany » Wed Nov 01, 2006 1:19 pm

That's a tough one. I have no idea how you'd go about doing that as you have to prove death. Do you have nothing else stating his death? I don't think an obituary would do it, but it's a start. A record of funeral arrangements? Anything?
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Postby Bex » Wed Nov 01, 2006 2:45 pm

I'm having a B* of a time getting it from Argentina. Emails get bounced back. Weird office hours for phone calls. It's funny, cause if my Great grandfather was alive, he'd only be 137 years old. Seems apparent to me that he can be safely considered dead. But I have no idea the logic in place at USCIS
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Postby Em » Wed Nov 01, 2006 2:46 pm

I am assuming that your great grandfather was born a long long time ago, and that, were he alive today, he would be more than 100 years old. I am also assuming that you are applying at a consulate in the U.S.

If both assumptions are correct, you may be able to get by with a certified statement from a close relative of your great grandfather (son or daughter, sister, brother, etc.). The closer the familial connection, the better the odds of the statement being accepted. Reasonably, the U.S. consulates would accept the fact of his death with such a statement and would understand the difficulties of obtaining such documentation from Buenos Aires.

Remember, too, that the most significant information you need to provide is the evidence of birth, marriage, and naturalization (or non naturalization). The death certificate, although requested, does not document that your great grandfather was an Italian at the time of your grandparent's birth. The other documents do provide this information and are, thus, more important.

You should, of course, get all certified statements apostilled. It is also always a good idea with an unusual situation such as this one, to seek the advice of a consular official.
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Postby Em » Wed Nov 01, 2006 2:48 pm

Sorry, I misread your question and thought you were having problems at the consulate.

My suggestion holds, however. A certified statement from one or several close relatives should work. No need for an apostille in the U.S., however. :D
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Postby Bex » Wed Nov 01, 2006 4:22 pm

I am going to write a letter to the USCIS with a filled out G639. The letter will give all the information I have on my great grandfather and a line descent. I will also state he would be 137 years old, were he alive today. Hopefully this will work instead of a death certificate.
I'll let everyone know (probably in about a year, ha)
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