Multiple Citizenships

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4 Citizenships Possible? Canada, UK, Switzerland, US?

Postby charlesnorbert » Sun Sep 09, 2007 6:18 am

I grew up in Canada and am a Canadian Citizen by birth. My mother is British and, as as a result, I have had my UK citizenship for over 15 years (I got it when I was 17). Also, my father is Swiss and in the same way, I received my Swiss citizenship about ten years ago.

Now, here's the thing. I have actually lived in the US for the last 14 years and have a green card. My wife and son are both U.S. citizens and I am considering naturalizing, because the U.S. has and will always continue to be my home. Question is, can I without losing any of my other citizenships?

Thanks@
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Postby mmaughan271 » Sun Sep 09, 2007 7:42 pm

Hi, Charles

The final part of the US naturalization process is to swear an oath in which you renounce citizenship in other countries. On the face of it, this answers your question.

In fact, the country of previous citizenship is free to ignore your renounciation of its citizenship if it wishes.

The previous poster says he did not lose his UK citizenship after taking on a second citizenship, and that is also my understanding of UK law.

But isn't it best for you to contact the nearest consulate of each of those countries and ask them? I am certain they have been asked this exact question before...
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Postby AnotherCitizenToBe » Sun Oct 21, 2007 9:41 am

I am just going to add this:

Receiving Italian citizenship jure sanguinis is not the same as "naturalizing".

In fact, as it is now written and as I understand it, those of us applying through the jure sanguinis process are not *becoming* Italian citizens, we in fact already *are* Italian citizens. What we are doing is merely providing the documentation to prove this fact and having our documentation recognized as accurate by the Italian government.

Persons who become *naturalized* Italian citizens through residency, etc, are an entirely different class and subject to entirely different rules in regards to other citizenship status.
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Arg/US/It

Postby usitalian » Wed Jul 23, 2008 3:43 pm

I was born in Argentina and currently reside in the US. In 2006, I became naturalized and received my US passport.

Now, through my Italian great grandmother I would like to request an Italian passport by jure sanguinis.

Does anyone know, with complete assurance, if this will create any type of conflict with my US or Argentine citizenship?
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Postby Tiffany » Wed Jul 23, 2008 5:12 pm

It will create no conflict with your US citizenship and that I say with complete assurance. I cannot say anything for sure with Argentine citizenship, but with the sheer amount of Argentinians applying for their Italian citizenship, I would doubt it creates a problem since most probably would not apply if it did.
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Postby usitalian » Wed Jul 23, 2008 5:16 pm

Thanks! How did you find this information? Are you a lawyer?

I have spent days and days between the us immigration site and other sites and found it very hard to verify anything regarding tri citizenship.
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Re: Arg/US/It

Postby David_ » Wed Jul 23, 2008 5:39 pm

usitalian wrote:I was born in Argentina and currently reside in the US. In 2006, I became naturalized and received my US passport.

Now, through my Italian great grandmother I would like to request an Italian passport by jure sanguinis.

Does anyone know, with complete assurance, if this will create any type of conflict with my US or Argentine citizenship?

I just wanted to add that you will NOT be able to qualify through your great grandmother unless her child (your grandparent) was born on or after 1948, which most likely makes you impossible to qualify.
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Postby Tiffany » Wed Jul 23, 2008 5:56 pm

Good point David and no usitalian, I am not a lawyer. I have just have a higher than normal interest in citizenship. You can however read it too: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_t ... _1753.html

Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship.


The site also goes on to talk about the intention to renounce, how it is needed in order to really renounce, and how the US government by default considers that when a US citizen naturalizes in another country that that person did not intend to renounce US citizenship. Jure sanguinis is not naturalization though.

Dual citienship vs tri citizenship is not that different. I am a dual citizen by birth (officially recognized American and Canadian) and eligible for two more - another from birth (need to have it recognized) and another from marriage (eligible to apply now).

None of them will interfere with any of my other citizenships, I have already checked thoroughly.
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Postby usitalian » Thu Jul 24, 2008 9:08 am

That's not good.

So what if my grandmother was born in Spain but is no longer alive... Will that get me the Spanish one?
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Postby usitalian » Thu Jul 24, 2008 9:12 am

Davis, are you sure about that? I just found this piece of information and it says that I would have to be born after 1948... not my grandfather.

"Your maternal grandfather was born in your native country, your maternal great grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of his birth, you were born after January 1st, 1948, and neither you nor your mother nor your grandfather ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis."
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Postby matta » Thu Jul 24, 2008 10:06 am

usitalian wrote:Davis, are you sure about that? I just found this piece of information and it says that I would have to be born after 1948... not my grandfather.

"Your maternal grandfather was born in your native country, your maternal great grandfather was an Italian citizen at the time of his birth, you were born after January 1st, 1948, and neither you nor your mother nor your grandfather ever renounced your right to Italian citizenship. If citizenship is acquired by birth in your country and you meet all these conditions, you qualify for Italian citizenship jure sanguinis."


Your great grandmother could not pass citizenship to her children before 1948. So, if your grandfather was born before 1948, he would not have received citizenship from your great grandmother, and you would not qualify, unless your great grandfather was an Italian citizen.
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Postby David_ » Thu Jul 24, 2008 3:18 pm

usitalian wrote:That's not good.

So what if my grandmother was born in Spain but is no longer alive... Will that get me the Spanish one?

I don't know if you can get Spanish Citizenship or not. From what I hear, Spain is the hardest of all countries to get the Citizenship because they know that millions of people in Latin America would qualify. I know for sure you qualify is either of your parents is/was a Spanish citizenship at the time of your birth.

http://www.euskosare.org/euskal_herria/ ... ationality

Nothing suggests grandparents here. You can do this: Latin American, Andorra, Philippines, Equatorial Guinea, Portugal and Sephardi citizens: 2 years of residence in Spain.
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Postby usitalian » Thu Jul 24, 2008 4:50 pm

So regarding my Italian option, I'm screwed?

They don't make exceptions?
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Postby matta » Thu Jul 24, 2008 4:57 pm

usitalian wrote:They don't make exceptions?


Nope. I legitimately qualify and they won't even make an exception on a documentation error for me.

Your best bet is to watch forums like this one and Expattalk to see if the law changes. There is a proposal in right now that would allow retroactive transmission of citizenship from mother to child before 1948. It's a long shot, but it's a possibility.

Your other option is residence in Italy, but it would take you 7 or 10 years (depending on how you interpret the law) for citizenship.
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Postby David_ » Thu Jul 24, 2008 6:08 pm

usitalian wrote:So regarding my Italian option, I'm screwed?

In short, yes. Your best route is to apply for a Visa in Spain and spend 2 years there to get their citizenship.
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