US trained attorney work in Italy?

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US trained attorney work in Italy?

Postby NYC_Jeff » Wed Apr 04, 2007 7:24 pm

Anybody have any experience or knowledge of the kind of jobs a U.S. educated and admitted attorney could find in Italy? I am an American citizen and don't appear to qualify for citizenship based on ancestry (though I believe I could if I lived there for 3 years based on my Italian grandparents).

I'd love to move there for some time but have no idea where to start looking or what I can expect to find. Any suggestions would be appreciated. thanks.
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Postby Tiffany » Wed Apr 04, 2007 9:36 pm

Somehow I thought a member, mfk, was an American trained lawyer living in Italy. However, I do not know if she works. I hope she responds.
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Postby jpp888 » Tue Apr 10, 2007 9:25 am

First response would be no work at all. US law is very different from Italian law and you would have to have in depth knowledge of all Italian statutes and procedures.

Think of it the other way around: if someone had years of experience with Italian law and was certified in Italy, they couldnt just walk into a courtroom in the US and argue a case. They would have to take the bar exam, etc.

This means that in order to work you have to first be trained and certified in Italy.

The only job I could think of that you could do without any further training is something like a corporate lawyer who was working for an Italian company with operations in the US. They might need someone who knew US corporate/tax law and was certified in the US.

Your best bet is to contact the organisation which certifies lawyers and solilcitors in Italy and find what you need to do in order to practice law.
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Postby NYC_Jeff » Tue Apr 10, 2007 10:41 am

What about corporate work; i.e., working for a US corporation in Italy? Or in the shorter term, what about professional exchange programs? I figured I wasn't going to become a licensed Italian attorney. I should've been more specific!
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Postby jpp888 » Wed Apr 11, 2007 6:05 am

You never know. Will have to look into it. It just seems unlikely that a US company would hire someone to do their US legal work and place them in Italy. Have to check around though.
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Postby AnotherCitizenToBe » Wed Apr 11, 2007 7:12 am

You didn't state your specialty nor which states you are licensed in, but I'll add a few options to the list anyway:

a) If you are fluent in Italian, you might find Italian company/companies which do business in the states and need advice on contract law, etc.

b) or, Italian individuals who wish to buy property in the states, enter into US-based business arrangements or partnerships with Americans, etc.

c) Act as a go-between for ex-pat Americans in Italy and their US-based attorneys who need to have legal work done at home, etc.

No matter how you slice it, I expect that if you are going to set up shop as an attorney in Italy, you are going to have to be licensed in some way. Perhaps the better route, at least initially, would be to set yourself up as a "consultant knowledgeable in the laws of the United States and the states of... "
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Postby italianlaw » Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:21 pm

Hello NYC_Jeff

JPP888 responses accurately reflect the reality of working in an Italian legal environment. FYI we address Italian succession matters and related filings, i,.e, Diritto di famiglia

Sonia Alioto
http://www.italianlaw.net
Novato, CA and Ferrara, Italy
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Postby flproject13 » Fri Apr 27, 2007 10:03 pm

I have a friend who is an NYC patent attorney, he quite frequently represents Italian companies trying to get issued US patents for various things (usually pharmacutical companies) He works with attorneys from US firms that have satelite offices in Italy. If you can speak italian chances are you might be able to be almost a liason in italy depending on the firm and your specialty.
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Postby italianlaw » Sat Apr 28, 2007 9:57 am

My area of concentration is Italian family law (Diritto di famiglia). It goes without saying that I went to law school in Italy. My clients are typically American attorneys and private clients residing outside of Italy looking for guidance on estate matters (le successioni) impacting their assets in Italy.

Sonia Alioto
http://www.italianlaw.net
Novato, CA
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Postby NuccioP » Sat May 12, 2007 5:47 pm

Jeff,

There are lots of US-trained corporate attorneys working in Italy for Italian subsidiaries of US companies. I'm a reporter and spoke to a bunch of them myself last week. Offhand, I can think of GE, Ford, Coca-Cola and Microsoft. Plus, there are a few branches of big US corporate law firms, like Paul Hastings and Shearman. You'll have to do some research, but there's work there for an attorney with corporate and business experience.
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Re: US trained attorney work in Italy?

Postby seannjay » Sat Nov 28, 2009 7:30 am

[quote="NYC_Jeff"]Anybody have any experience or knowledge of the kind of jobs a U.S. educated and admitted attorney could find in Italy? I am an American citizen and don't appear to qualify for citizenship based on ancestry (though I believe I could if I lived there for 3 years based on my Italian grandparents).

I'd love to move there for some time but have no idea where to start looking or what I can expect to find. Any suggestions would be appreciated. thanks.[/quote]
In a handful of U.S. states, one may become an attorney (a so-called country .... In some countries
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