Working in Italy/EU

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Working in Italy/EU

Postby thechef65 » Wed Aug 06, 2008 6:41 pm

Does anyone have any realistic idea how easy/difficult it is to obtain a job in Italy/EU? I have an economics degree from a major American university. Obviously the main issue would be that I do not speak Italian at this point. I have just received my letter confirming my citizenship and figure there isnt any better place to learn Italian than Italy. I would also be open to moving to England/Ireland. If anyone has any worthwhile experience please let me know.
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Postby yjg » Wed Aug 06, 2008 7:38 pm

Try this forum, all expats living in Italy. They probably have some great advice.

http://expattalk.com/eve
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Postby Tiffany » Wed Aug 06, 2008 8:01 pm

It's difficult even as a citizen, but for real life accounts, use the site yjg gave you. They are a good honest bunch and will tell it to you like it is.
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Postby thechef65 » Wed Aug 06, 2008 10:11 pm

Thanks Tiff and yjg. I will look at the site that you provided. It looks like there is some decent info on sites which provide information on available jobs for English speakers. Do either of you have any idea which sites may be useful for finding finance/banking/economics jobs in London? Thanks
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Postby matta » Wed Aug 06, 2008 10:19 pm

thechef65 wrote:Thanks Tiff and yjg. I will look at the site that you provided. It looks like there is some decent info on sites which provide information on available jobs for English speakers. Do either of you have any idea which sites may be useful for finding finance/banking/economics jobs in London? Thanks


Just throwing it out there, but many of the big consulting and investment firms will hire you in the US and move you internationally, provided you have authorization to work in the other country. I've had several friends make the international move a year or two after working in the US.
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Postby Tiffany » Wed Aug 06, 2008 10:27 pm

That is probably the best option. If you can do this, I'd go for it.
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Postby thechef65 » Thu Aug 07, 2008 8:59 am

That is true and I have considered applying with some of the major banking and consulting firms in America however due to the exchange rate I was hoping to get a salary in GBP or Euros. I was under the impression that if I were to get a position in America my salary would be in dollars the converted. I will continue to look around and see what I find. Thanks all.
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Postby matta » Thu Aug 07, 2008 12:41 pm

double post.
Last edited by matta on Thu Aug 07, 2008 12:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby matta » Thu Aug 07, 2008 12:43 pm

thechef65 wrote:That is true and I have considered applying with some of the major banking and consulting firms in America however due to the exchange rate I was hoping to get a salary in GBP or Euros. I was under the impression that if I were to get a position in America my salary would be in dollars the converted. I will continue to look around and see what I find. Thanks all.


Yeah, they'll pay you in US$ while in the US, GBP while in the UK, Euro while in Italy, etc.

Usually, most companies have an internal conversion system for moves based the going rate for that position in the new location (e.g. the salary at which they could get someone already in the new location to take that job). For instance, if you work as an engineer in Houston, and move to San Fancisco, they'll give you a pay increase based on the market reference for engineers in San Francisco, not necessarily based on the cost of living. I was offered a similar move a few years ago. The cost of living in San Francisco was 2x as much as Houston, but the market reference for engineers in San Francisco was only 10% higher. So I was offered a 10% raise, which would have resulted in a substantial loss of buying power. I declined, but if I really wanted to live in San Francisco, I would have accepted.

From what I hear, you end up taking a pay cut most of the time when you move from the US to the UK. Apparently nearly all jobs pay less in the UK when compared to the US. In addition, London is an expensive place to live, so you take another hit to your buying power from that.

But these are good things to ask.
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correct

Postby abx415 » Thu Aug 07, 2008 2:00 pm

What matta said is correct.

Larger firms will have pay ranges for 'grades'. Those ranges and grades are tied to geographies/local market rates, etc.

So while the pound may be higher now, and that might mean their ranges are temporarily 20% inflated past the USD, the cost of living in London may be 40% higher, and just as the USD is depreciating due to the credit crunch, the GBP is predicted to correct as well. The US isn't the only country with inflated housing prices or a credit crunch.
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Postby anthane12 » Tue Aug 26, 2008 9:04 am

It's really hard getting work in Italy,but Wanted in Rome does list jobs -- if you don't mind teaching I'd try sending out C.V.s to American colleges in Italy. They don't pay very well but they are often looking. Good luck.
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Postby matta » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:47 am

anthane12 wrote:It's really hard getting work in Italy,but Wanted in Rome does list jobs -- if you don't mind teaching I'd try sending out C.V.s to American colleges in Italy. They don't pay very well but they are often looking. Good luck.


Italian colleges let you teach without a doctorate? Actually, I would be interested in knowing how the university system in Italy works. I know it varies greatly from country to country.
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Re: Working in Italy/EU

Postby piccola_pampina » Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:04 pm

From experience looking for a job as a non-EU citizen because I have not gone through my citizenship process yet, it is almost impossible to find work. The government already had red tape restrictions for employment of non-EU citizens in place. Due to the current economic and employment issues, like we have here, restrictions have been further tightened. Many employers are not really willing to go through all the paperwork and the long process to give a work visa, unfortunately... unless you have very specific qualifications. For example a doctor or a high rank individual in a company. They will have to prove that no Italian citizen is fit to fill the position. The next step would be hiring a citizen of the EU. If they prove that there is no EU citizen to fill the position, they might hire a non-EU. However, they might rather wait for another candidate to come along at another time, rather than do the paperwork. For Italian citizens, it is also difficult to find work. I'm not trying to discourage you, but just telling you the facts as you asked. There have been many willing to work illegally, however, in the long run (and short run), it creates a big problem. There is no job security. Employers can easily relieve you of your position and not have a reason.

You can look for employment opportunities on sites like monster.com, as they have an Italian version. most job descriptions are written in Italian, and I'd say it's quite vital to know the language if applying there.

Hope this helps and good luck!
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Re: Working in Italy/EU

Postby zagnut » Wed Jun 03, 2009 3:53 am

Italy has currently frozen work visa quotas. So wait a few years, if the economy picks up, maybe they'll re-open the flussi.
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Re:

Postby Nicola » Wed Jun 03, 2009 11:21 am

matta wrote:
anthane12 wrote:It's really hard getting work in Italy,but Wanted in Rome does list jobs -- if you don't mind teaching I'd try sending out C.V.s to American colleges in Italy. They don't pay very well but they are often looking. Good luck.


Italian colleges let you teach without a doctorate? Actually, I would be interested in knowing how the university system in Italy works. I know it varies greatly from country to country.



Is this different in the US? In Canada you'll find many types of courses taught without a doctorate. Undergrad accounting is often taught this way . Usually the teacher is a CA [US CPA]. Working lawyers often teach business "law".
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