Education

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Education

Postby Anonymous » Tue Aug 01, 2006 2:23 am

Hi :roll:
I'm a student in Australia and i just recieved my italian passport,
i am very interested in know how the university education system in itally works is it really free.
Kind regards
Samantha
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Postby Em » Thu Aug 03, 2006 4:17 pm

It's very inexpensive. Of course, you will need to apply and show that your Australian high school diploma is equivalent to that received from an Italian liceo. Some universities in Italy are more competitive than others. And, of course, all courses are conducted in Italian.
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Postby Anonymous » Wed Aug 16, 2006 10:39 am

Yesa, education is free in Italy, as per the website ICGS. However, the consulate in Chicago also says it is free.

There is no tuition, But, there are certain "fees" to be paid, which are minimal compared to the US system. As EM says, it is relatively inexpensive. However, certain higher learning universities and private schools would charge a small tuition, but it is nothing compared to the thousands and thousands of dollars, US colleges ask for. Also, many Italians have a low income, in which to live, in which case, their fees are either paid for by the government or greatly reduced to where you can afford it.
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Postby jpp888 » Tue Feb 06, 2007 5:28 am

Well free university and free healthcare are myths. The fact is that both are paid for through your 22-48% rate of tax and social contributions. There aren't any fees to study at the university (aside from some small admistrative fees, etc.) but then you will end up paying for the education you have been given in the form of taxes when you enter the workforce. Everyone who lives or works in Italy pays for these things, whether one uses them or not. The only way one would get any of these things free is if they lived in Italy and never worked a single day in their life.

In answer to the main question though: all the courses are taught in Italian and since you didnt graduate from a school in Italy you will be required to prove your Italian competancy with an Italian language exam (i.e. like foreigners who study in Australia are required to take a TOEFL or similar). Second is whether the Italian system will recognise your Australian qualifications. They may or may not accept your education level as equal to theirs, and translations of your transcripts may be required. Then using your Italian language exam and your school qualifications from Australia you will have to apply for a place at a chosen university. Due to the fact that without tuition fees anyone can study at the university there is a lot of competition and so places are hard to come by.

The procedure will differ depending on which course and university you wish to apply for, but that would be a quick overview of what is required. Check with the individual university for the exact procedure and requirements.
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Postby ciaobella » Wed Feb 07, 2007 8:13 pm

I am happy someone else is dispelling the myth that healthcare and tuition are "free". We have the same mindset in thie country. Everything comes with a price.

Our Italian friends' son is at the University in Torino. It costs them about $1000 a semester in Italy. This is a little less than what I pay for my son at San Francisco State University per semester for tuition (about $1400). But most Italian students live at home whereas my son lives on campus and pays room and board. I'm not sure what the other Universities in Italy wind up costing but it certainly doesn't seem that much different. In fact the Community College in my area charges $20 a unit. For a full time student (usually about 16 units) thats $320 a semester here. That's hard to beat.

And yes you more than make up for it once you start working in Italy and paying that higher tax rate. The same goes for healthcare.
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Postby Em » Thu Feb 08, 2007 8:58 am

I agree with both of you. There's no free ride anywhere. Someone has to pay to build and maintain those schools; someone has to pay the teachers' salaries. In Italy, though, everybody pays through taxes. I guess the tuition charged in the U.S. could be considered user based--that is, if you use the service, you pay for it.

I'm a bit envious, though, Ciaobella. California has a superb public education system and somehow manages to keep tuition low. Here on the east coast, we're not so fortunate. :cry:
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Re: Education

Postby StevenV » Wed Apr 15, 2009 10:31 pm

Em:

I'd make a slight correction to your remark and write that California USED TO have a superb public education system before Prop 13 and the whole "tax revolt" bs came along with its belief that taxes were the ultimate evil, the alpha and omega of oppression...

The lame American myth of "rugged individiualism" persists, even or especially among those who--Joan Didion points out in her fine book about CA Where I was From--actually owe their livelihood to government programs (such as the defense industry).

Yes, Europeans pay higher taxes, but any American who can't see how he or she is paying in so many ways for low taxes is simply a fool.
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Re: Education

Postby Nicola » Thu Apr 16, 2009 1:27 am

The con in the US is all the different taxes.

Federal taxes?
State taxes?
Don't you have local taxes to?
Property taxes

You don't get health care for that so add in what the health care costs you. If it's employer based factor that in.

Add it up. Depending on your source of income you won't find it that different to Europe.
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Re: Education

Postby zagnut » Thu Apr 16, 2009 3:04 am

How timely given the Tea Parties yesterday. Love hearing these people whine about how high their taxes are in the US. They complain the top tax rate on the wealthy is too high (though it's simply been restored to the levels it was at under Reagan), meanwhile income tax rates in Italy are higher across the board. In addition we have 20% IVA on most everything we buy and gas is over $6 per gallon. The US has very low taxes compared to the rest of the world.

On the other hand, most of the rest of the world has universal health care, cheaper university costs, etc. You pay your money, and take your choice.
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Re: Education

Postby Nicola » Thu Apr 16, 2009 11:59 am

It's not. Investment income in Italy is a flat 20%. The US is moving to what 28% at the federal level? Plus state.

Most of the rich don't take large salaries. Buffet takes a salary of about 100K but gets almost all of his income from dividends. That's not unusual. It's a common tactic for people who own businesses. Or look at what the hedge funds do. They pay capital gains on carried interest. If you have the right tax lawyer you do whatever needed to not get a salary.
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Re: Education

Postby zagnut » Thu Apr 16, 2009 1:52 pm

Nicola, the tax burden on Italians is greater than Americans. You've looked only at the investment income rate. Look at all of the taxes.
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Re: Education

Postby cammeresi » Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:58 pm

Dear StevenV,

Thanks for letting me know that I am a fool, for this is news to me.

Kisses,
Sidney August Cammeresi IV
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Re: Education

Postby DoreenJoy » Tue Apr 21, 2009 7:00 pm

Don't even get me started on Prop 13. California is going bankrupt because of it. Our entire proposition system is out of control. Some issues are too important to be voted on by the majority.
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Re: Education

Postby zagnut » Wed Apr 22, 2009 12:23 am

Agreed. There's a good reason the Founding Fathers chose a democratic republic rather than a straight up democracy.
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american univerisity of rome

Postby Monica » Sun Apr 26, 2009 2:46 am

OK so their is taht university they are outrageously expensive.

does anyone know how to get your TOEFL certificate to teach english in italy without paying 5 grand?
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