I didnt recieve a No Record letter from USCIS

Determine if an ancestor was ever naturalized and, if so, discuss your consulate's requirements for proving this.

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I didnt recieve a No Record letter from USCIS

Postby manning626 » Wed Oct 24, 2007 9:43 am

there is a paper entitieled Alien Registration FOrm dated August 28 1940 which says he applied for first citizen papers in the US but filed petition for naturalization is blank

and they gave me a paper that is titled Application for Certificate of Identificiation and it says that he received his first papers on sept 18 1941

my grandma was born in 1930's...

However, they did not send me a letter of no records. Where do I go from here? I waited 2 years to get this response.
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Postby manning626 » Fri Oct 26, 2007 12:26 am

so what do i do next?

thanks

edit: on his death certificate it said Italy as Nationality it that means anything
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Italy on Birth Certificate

Postby NOLA » Fri Oct 26, 2007 8:25 am

Hi,

That just means that he was born in Italy. It has no bearing on whether he was naturalized or not. I did see some death certificates which indicate status i.e., citizen of US, alien, but not in NY.
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Re: Italy on Birth Certificate

Postby AnotherCitizenToBe » Fri Oct 26, 2007 10:16 am

NOLA wrote:Hi,

That just means that he was born in Italy. It has no bearing on whether he was naturalized or not. I did see some death certificates which indicate status i.e., citizen of US, alien, but not in NY.


Both of my Italian-born grandfathers died in New York State, outside NYC (which has its own vital records system). Both of their death certificates indicate "Italy" as the Place of Birth; one has a box titled "Citizen of US" within which is written "Yes", the other says something like "Citizen of:" and "USA" is handwritten within.

The first died in 1946, the other in 1961.
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Postby penguindump » Fri Oct 26, 2007 10:21 am

Manning, in case you were asking whether the death certificate noting "Citizen of Italy" had any bearing in the eyes of the consulates or not, the asnwer is no. Death certificates contain information that a family member or friend have given.. Not any kind of government official.
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Postby AnotherCitizenToBe » Fri Oct 26, 2007 11:22 am

penguindump wrote:Manning, in case you were asking whether the death certificate noting "Citizen of Italy" had any bearing in the eyes of the consulates or not, the asnwer is no. Death certificates contain information that a family member or friend have given.. Not any kind of government official.


No, merely as a *possible* (probable?) indication as to naturalization. In the case of my paternal grandfather, I assumed (and my mother agreed) that he never naturalized. It was his death certificate (Citizen of the US: Yes) which encouraged me seek out the actual records.

Prior to this realization I was resigned to having to wait for USCIS to produce a no records letter.
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Postby penguindump » Fri Oct 26, 2007 11:29 am

Yes, it is a helpful bit of information, as it was in your case.. I'm glad you didn't have to wait for USCIS!
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Postby jamato » Fri Oct 26, 2007 1:52 pm

This brings up a good point for those of us who received "half-baked" packets from USCIS-- I too received copies of the "First papers", but no copy or mention of a Naturalization certificate. I specifically asked on my FOIA request to send me ONLY the Certificate of Naturalization, and if there wasn't one, to send me Letter of No Record.

I know SF requires either the Certificate or the Letter of No Record, and all I've got are this mass of weird petitions and intents. Has anyone else been in this predicament? If so, what did you do? In my eyes, they didn't really respond to my request appropriately, and sent me things I didn't ask for.

J
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Postby penguindump » Fri Oct 26, 2007 4:24 pm

That doesn't really make sense.. The consulate should be satisfied if the first papers were filed after the birth of the relative you're applying through. I don't understand so many of their regulations :(
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Postby AnotherCitizenToBe » Fri Oct 26, 2007 5:21 pm

penguindump wrote:That doesn't really make sense.. The consulate should be satisfied if the first papers were filed after the birth of the relative you're applying through. I don't understand so many of their regulations :(


This is a good point; I think it really depends on the consulate official who is reviewing the case. Once again, the answer is probably to contact the consulate and try to get a thumbs up/thumbs down in writing (email).
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Citizeneship on BC

Postby NOLA » Sat Oct 27, 2007 10:27 am

Penguindump,

I made an error. I hadn't checked all of the death certificates for quite a while, but I did notice that they had spaces for Country of Birth. What I had been referring to was something that was on the old certificates of death. For my grandfather, who died in l931, they listed both his parents, and there was a space for their country of origin which is no longer on the DC. My mom and dad's certificates just have their parents names (which I had to change to their Italian first names), not their places of birth.
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Postby manning626 » Sat Oct 27, 2007 10:55 am

AnotherCitizenToBe wrote:
penguindump wrote:That doesn't really make sense.. The consulate should be satisfied if the first papers were filed after the birth of the relative you're applying through. I don't understand so many of their regulations :(


This is a good point; I think it really depends on the consulate official who is reviewing the case. Once again, the answer is probably to contact the consulate and try to get a thumbs up/thumbs down in writing (email).


I live in Thailand, do you think it'd be possible for me to apply at any consulate or must I apply in the state I was born?
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Postby penguindump » Sat Oct 27, 2007 10:58 am

If you live in Thailand, you can apply there.
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